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20121201
20121231
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Q & A 5
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CSPAN 5
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Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:00am EST
, ports. and they did over a week. at first they thought they might get 10,000 or 12,000 out. then every sail boat, yacht, everything that could float was sent over and they got more than 200,000 british troops off and 130,000 french. i found it interesting that several thousand french troops, maybe 10 or 20, chose not to go. they thought the war is over, we lost and they went home back to their farms. how they fared no one knows. host: whether was your reaction in great britain to dunkirk? guest: churchill -- and churchill did this -- he made a defeat sound as if it was the ost heroic -- and he saeid evacuations, retreats are not victories, he was clear on this. but the way he said it made dunkirk sound like a heroic victory. and the british people came away saying, well, if we can do that, we can bloody well whip the hun. well, they had it backwards. they were running, swimming literally, home without their weapons, without their tanks and jeeps -- they didn't have generals then but trucks and rifles. they came back soaking wet with no weapons and church ill is telling the paoeeople th
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 8:00pm EST
of the british aristocracy would have been. but he was an odd duck. when he captured and build some of the ports in the ohio valley, he named them after his subsidiary titles. he was the beer and blair -- the baron blair. it was fort dunmore for a while. he had an ego a mile wide. >> so what was the relationship in those days between george washington and dunmore? >> they knew each other. late winter, before the hostilities got intense in the capital of virginia, they were on some terms. there were both land speculators and they shared in this interest and george washington was developing those and dunmore was buying all that he could get. but then they fell out. i don't think they fell out so much for personal reasons. way of doing business was sending raiding parties and capture people. >> what was his relationship with the citizens of virginia? >> he did not have much in the way of political clout when he was in norfolk. his troops were in control of the immediate area, but basically he did not have a wide reach, except through the sloops and little ships that they would send up some of the r
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 8:00pm EST
of the raf. it was a good plan. while daring -- goering got pillar's permission to bomb the ports -- bombing was so ineffective for both sides. churchill said, give it back to them. and that was the beginning. so, the blitz starts on september 7 in the evening. the germans came the next 81, 82 nights, something like that. and the terror bombing that they had feared and predicted began. there was no stopping the bombers. the bombers always got through. >> tommy people were killed and wounded in great britain? >> i think about 45,000 londoners were killed. at the end, the v2 rockets came. 60,000 people in a country of 47 million. you extrapolate -- that would be almost 200,000 americans. unimaginable numbers now in united states. >> physically, what did winston churchill do during that time? where did he live? how did you relate to london during the blitz? >> he, with reluctance, left no. 10 downing st.. which was of firetrap. if a bomb had hit, that would've been the end. he went underground. the underground war rooms were a little more safe. a cave with 200 soldiers, families, typists, gener
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)